Resources: research methods and statistics questions

Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Here are some practice questions for research methods and statistics because, frankly, you can never have too many of them. I’ve written them to foreground the need to (1) calculate tests; and (2) refer to the contextual material in answers because these are key requirements of the Edexcel specification for RMS. However, they should be useful to pretty much anyone.

 

 

Resources: biopsychology revision summaries

Kim J, Matthews NL, Park S. Wikimedia Commons.

Here are some brief revision summaries for Edexcel bio-psychology topics (but probably useful to others). They cover: drugs and the brain, evolution and aggression, genes and aggressionbrain structure and aggression and hormones and aggression.

Resources: evaluating the working memory model

Here’s a jigsaw activity for developing students’ evaluations of the working memory model. It’s designed for four ‘expert’ groups and three or four ‘jigsaw’ groups and covers (1) experimental support; (2) support from studies of the brain; (3) practical applications; (4) limitations of the model. There’s a set of working memory jigsaw stimuli and a slideshow with a couple of recall/application exercises tagged on at the end.

Resources: research methods and statistics

Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Here are a couple of bits for teaching elements of research methods and statistics. There’s an exercise on test choice and justification and two sets of stimulus-based methods questions: RMS question 1; RMS question 2.

Resources: working memory

Here are a couple of bits for teaching Baddeley & Hitch’s (1974) working memory model. There’s a slideshow, a set of application tasks to help students understand the distinction between the different components and the idea of processing conflicts in WM, and a summary of some relevant research studies with space for students to comment/interpret.

Resources: synoptic topics (science, reductionism, ethics, socially sensitive research).

Here are some things I’ve made for teaching synoptic issues recently. There’s an Edexcel bias, so YMMV. There’s an example essay on ethical issues, and another essay on socially sensitive research. There’s also a reading on the features of a scientific approach, a comparison table focused on the features of the scientific approach, a slideshow on reductionism (with activities) and an accompanying reading on philosophical reductionism.

Resources: research methods and statistics questions

Here are some scenario based questions on research methods and statistics.  There’s one on experiments and tests of difference and one on correlational designs and tests.  Example answers are included at the end.

Round-up: criminological psychology

Image: Tony Webster.

I’ve finished teaching criminological psychology for the time being so here’s a round-up of the resources I’ve published here recently on the topic.

Resources: drug treatments for sex offenders

Source: wikimedia.

Here are some bits I’ve made recently for teaching drug treatments for sex offenders. There’s an evaluation exercise where students are invited to identify weaknesses in a sample of evaluative writing about drug treatments for sex offenders and then write their own improved version (includes a teacher cribsheet with the main issues). There’s also a summary of some recent research  in this area and a short slideshow to support the lesson.

Resources: anger management with offenders

Here is a lesson on anger management with offenders. There is a slideshow giving background including Novaco’s cognitive model of anger and two application problems where students identify anger-relevant process and suggest ways of addressing them. There is also a results table and some extracts from Henwood et al’s (2015) meta-analysis of anger management with offenders. The lesson assumes you have set preparation learning on the topic.